Irish Centre http://irishcentre.org/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 08:55:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://irishcentre.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Irish Centre http://irishcentre.org/ 32 32 Ash reignites fire in Downpatrick’s hometown https://irishcentre.org/ash-reignites-fire-in-downpatricks-hometown/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 10:05:36 +0000 https://irishcentre.org/ash-reignites-fire-in-downpatricks-hometown/

LOCAL legends return to their old stomping grounds for a summertime celebration and punters look to the winter months with announcements of new shows and releases awash this week.

Downtime Summerfest, the Downpatrick-based arts festival, announced this week that local band and headliners Ash will headline this year’s main stage. The three-piece emerged from town in the mid-90s and makes a rare appearance now and then. But it’s their first in years and attendees are rightly excited.

Local songwriter Charlie Hanlon and the Speedy Mullan Blues Band are also active on the indie scene. Festival chairman Philip Campbell said: “Our aim is to accentuate the positive aspects of Downpatrick and Ash is something we can be proud of. We wanted to mark their accomplishments with the unveiling of the Girl from Mars mural and when the band voiced their approval we thought, let’s see if they’d be up for playing a gig in the city? »

This summer also sees the 10th edition of the EastSide Arts Festival which takes over venues, plazas and studios in the city’s eastern block. With cultural pop-ups like Vault Arts Studios and Banana Block, there’s plenty to see and do on a normal day. ESAF simply puts a host of workshops, comedy, food, fashion and, of course, music front and center.

Stuart Bailie, editor of culture magazine Dig With It, hosted an evening of indie music headlined by New Pagans, fresh off their European tour, and backed by Lemonade Shoelace and Winnie Ama. But for those with a dance mentality, independent promoters The Night Institute have secured the likes of Optimo as well as local producers Timmy Stewart and Jordan Nocturne for several nights of club music across the neighborhood. With songwriters Ciaran Lavery (whom we’ve talked about at length in previous columns, one of our favourites) and Owen Denvir taking the stage alongside a full schedule of events, it’s a festival not to be missed. to lack.

Meanwhile, in Dublin, one of Dublin’s most iconic venues turns 10… plus two. The Workman’s Club has hosted a wide variety of names over the years, but missed its 10th anniversary due to Covid-19 restrictions. Now, two years later, the concert that was supposed to take place has finally taken place, with 10 artists booked to headline the iconic stage. Names such as Villagers and upcoming bands like Skinner and Pretty Happy will ring in the 10th/12th anniversary of one of the pillars of Irish indie music.

New Pagans take center stage at an evening of indie music hosted by Dig With It editor Stuart Bailie

2Gallery

New Pagans take center stage at an evening of indie music hosted by Dig With It editor Stuart Bailie

In other live news, we learned that the Boyne Music Festival will be returning this year with events across Drogheda. Venturing further away from the indie world and more into neoclassical composers, this year’s festival explores the theme “Beauty, Love and Justice”.

Performers include singers Naomi Louisa O’Connell and Joshua Stewart, violist Paul Cassidy, cellist Jacqueline Thomas, clarinetist Jessie Grimes and pianist Deirdre Brenner. Superb renditions of contemporary and classical instruments will be on display at the festival centre, Townley Hall, as well as the Highlanes Gallery and St Peter’s Church of Ireland. Coupled with news of BICEP and Le Boom’s headline dates for 3Olympia and the announcement of Sorcha Richardson’s UK and Irish title (Limelight 2, be here or be square), it was one of the busiest weeks in music. live of the year.

And as always, we end this week’s column by highlighting some of the best indie releases of the week…

Singer Maija Sofia wowed me with her performance on Sorbet’s “I Heard His Scythe” and I’ve been a fast fan ever since. His most recent, “O Theremin,” is a dark, gothic take on indie folk and songwriting. With a voice that could carve marble, this new track is a dreamlike, iridescent journey through the world of Sofia.

And bringing up the rear is Echo Northstar’s debut album, the fuzzy “Someone Else.” The brainchild of Paddy Hennessy, formerly of HappyAlone, this new rock tone is an understated, textured start. Living on the softer side of the scales in terms of production, the synthetic haze on vocals and acoustics gives this track a real alternative feel.

Do you have anything to say on this issue?
If so, why not send a letter to the editor via this link?

]]>
Kinsale’s Rare 1784 featured in a new series on Irish cuisine by John Torode https://irishcentre.org/kinsales-rare-1784-featured-in-a-new-series-on-irish-cuisine-by-john-torode/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 17:04:24 +0000 https://irishcentre.org/kinsales-rare-1784-featured-in-a-new-series-on-irish-cuisine-by-john-torode/

Kinsale’s new restaurant, Rare 1784 at the Blue Haven Hotel, features in the next episode of John Torode’s Ireland on Thursday 11 August. This new food and travel series currently airs every Thursday and Sunday on Food Network and Discovery+ to global audiences.

Rare 1784 is a craft Irish cocktail and dining experience located in Kinsale at the start of the Wild Atlantic Way. They recently opened a new Moët garden, which you can enjoy before choosing to dine from their tasting menu or the a la carte small plates.

In this mini-series, celebrity Australian-British chef, restaurateur and cookbook author John Torode learns about Irish restaurants and meets local producers, farmers and chefs who are making their mark on the Irish food scene. In the series to date, Chapter One and Ballymaloe House have been featured.

Blue Haven’s Ciarán Fitzgerald and Chef Meeran Manzoor along with the Rare crew hosted John Torode and his film crew at the restaurant for two days to film and taste.

Ciarán commented, “We were very honored to have one of our food icons, John Torode, come and see what we do at Rare. The past 2 years have allowed our team to get creative and think outside the box when it comes to creating Rare. We then focused on execution and delivery, bringing the creativity of the food and beverage team to the customer in a very different and unique way. We are very proud of our team and excited to have their work showcased to a global audience in the John Torode series.

Chef Meeran commented, “I’m from India and when I was a teenager we used to watch Masterchef. It’s something I’ve always followed. It’s crazy to think that the circle is complete, from me as a viewer to now participate in a program with John Torode, cooking a dish for him and with him. It was a special moment to cherish for me. »

]]>
Remembering the Irish music legend https://irishcentre.org/remembering-the-irish-music-legend/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 08:18:11 +0000 https://irishcentre.org/remembering-the-irish-music-legend/

When Chicago musician Jimmy Keane first informed many of us via social media that his longtime friend and fellow Chicagoan Dennis Cahill had passed away on June 20, the message was short but poignant.

Before taking her last breath, Cahill’s wife of 10 years, Mary Joyce, leaned over and kissed him moments after he shared two tracks from Martin Hayes and Cahill’s debut album, The Lonesome Touch for Green Linnet. Records in 1997. The tracks were ‘The Lament for Limerick’ and ‘My Love is in America’. Appropriately, they conveyed the importance of the present moment and of an extraordinary life drawing to a close.

Dennis Cahill was 68 when complications from a long illness took him to Chicago in June. Born in Chicago on June 16, 1954, he grew up on the South Side but was an ardent Cubs fan.

He started playing the guitar at the age of nine and would make music his lifelong profession, playing a wide range of genres before becoming one of the most creative and famous guitarists in traditional music. Irish. Many of us in the tradosphere were unaware that his early performing career was as a singer/songwriter in the folk/rock scene around Chicago and the Midwest who had a successful partnership with another Clareman, George Casey of West Clare .

More than 35 years ago, his life would take a different turn when he met a newly arrived immigrant from Clare, Martin Hayes, who landed in Chicago in the mid-1980s. They played in a Celtic jazz-folk band -rock called Midnight Court into the Chicagoland bar scene and festival circuit.

Then something clicked between them and Martin persuaded Dennis to get into traditional music as a duo, and there was something very rare but magical about the way the tandem explored time-worn tunes in the canon. traditional.

For 30 years, the combination of Hayes on fiddle and Cahill on guitar revolutionized the performance of traditional music as they performed on the finest stages of performing arts centers around the world, saved from being trapped in the bars of Chicago.

Their approach seemed very simple taking old Irish melodies, starting very slowly then speeding up a bit to explore all the nuances that could be gleaned from them while creating an explosive reaction between Hayes’ fiery fiddle playing and spare playing. and precise of Cahill. accompaniment merging unusual chords and rhythm all around the melody.

Siobhan Long in her obituary for Cahill in The Irish Times (June 26) put it succinctly: “Cahill’s minimalism may have sometimes been seen as simple, but it was never that. Beneath the bare bones of his guitar lines lie the most intricate and carefully crafted arrangements. Cahill was never just an accompanist.

Irish President Michael D. Higgins, who is said to have seen the couple perform together very often, including during a meeting at the White House with President Barack Obama, further suggested reflecting on Cahill’s prowess: “Dennis brought a unique and innovative style to his guitar playing while being deeply respectful of the essence of traditional Irish music.

So many of Hayes and Cahill’s friends and fans have gathered online over the past week to remember the quiet, gentle man who struck a good balance between traveling the world with Hayes and returning home. in Chicago. There were many stories of him hosting music sessions around town, offering help and support to young musicians and also lending his very attentive ear and production skills to people who came to his house. and his North Side recording studio.

Like so many other commentators, I have always enjoyed meeting Dennis over the years at countless performances and enjoying his great sense of humor and discussions of politics or sports. A few times we stayed as logistical castmates when the Tulla Ceili Band went on tour in 1997 for their 50th anniversary, and a few years later for Lincoln Center’s Midsummer Night’s Swing dance series. It was great spending time with him during the quiet hours on the road.

It was also an opportunity to see how Cahill had bonded with the Hayes family (Father P. Joe Hayes, the band’s frontman and Peggy, Martin’s mother, who kept a room for the frequent stays of Dennis in Ireland), and also with the members of the Tulla Band as well. The very definition of hail is well fulfilled.

It was an enduring musical partnership and friendship between Cahill and Hayes that reflected the gentle and genuine natures of both men. Hayes’ exploration for further musical collaboration saw them continue to work together in the successful and innovative ensemble The Gloaming, and later the Martin Hayes Quartet with Liz Knowles and Doug Wieselman. Much of this full heritage can still be discovered on records at MartinHayes.com

Hayes wrote a very heartfelt and thoughtful reminiscence to his longtime partner on a trip last week that he shared on Facebook, and I’ll leave the final words here as a testament to that relationship and its impact on the world. traditional music.

“We started a musical journey many years ago in the barrooms of Chicago, we didn’t think we would ever make it out of those bars to the concert stage, but today the president of Ireland and the Government’s Minister for the Arts were both writing about the huge impact you have had on the world of traditional music.You have come out of the bar scene and onto some of the finest stages in the world .

“You really succeeded, you brought everything together in a more beautiful crystallization of your loves and musical influences. Nobody before you had ever played those chords and rhythms with Irish music like you did. You’ve paired the beauty of these traditional Irish melodies with your own equally beautiful hypnotic chord sequences and rhythms.

“Every night we played we gave it our all, we zigzagged around until we locked ourselves in. Some of those moments were sublime moments where our connection was truly telepathic.

“There were so many times on stage where you could just read my mind and I hope you still can…we come from different musical worlds but together we created our own musical world and I think that we made a difference. I am forever indebted and grateful to you for all those magical years of music, friendship and fun.

Condolences to Mary, Cahill’s wife, his daughter-in-law Clíodhna and his sister Mairéad, as well as to Martin Hayes and his many close friends around the world.

]]>
Animated Irish film portrays American tech tycoons on a Dublin pub crawl https://irishcentre.org/animated-irish-film-portrays-american-tech-tycoons-on-a-dublin-pub-crawl/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 14:02:24 +0000 https://irishcentre.org/animated-irish-film-portrays-american-tech-tycoons-on-a-dublin-pub-crawl/

SILICON DOCKS

What if we take a sample of, say, 10 early web pioneers and subject them to the same kind of distortions that everyone experiences online in the 21st century?

A trailer has appeared online for a new film from award-winning Irish director Graham Jones titled SILICON DOCKS.

The animated film is set during the final days of Trump’s presidency and depicts a doomed pub crawl in Dublin led by a group of American tech tycoons, banned from visiting each other at European headquarters during the early days of Covid. -19 but urgently need to agree on whether or not to sign a crucial EU deal.

The satirical, urban odyssey features a great conflict between Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and his nemesis Evan Spiegel who created Snapchat, as well as tensions between space runners Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk – not to mention many other dramas endured by the cold and frustrated “tech rockstars”. as they stumble around locked Dublin in desperate need of a pint.

“Here in Ireland we have so many giant American tech companies operating in Silicon Docks, which is a little area a few minutes from where I grew up in the 80s and was obviously very different back then” , says Jones. “This seismic shift in my hometown really got me thinking about everyday tech users, regular tech workers, and just our modern tech society as a whole. So I thought it might be interesting to do a little experiment. What happens if we take a sample group of, say, 10 early web pioneers and subject them to the same kind of distortions that everyone else experiences online in the 21st century?”

Jones’ films have often received critical acclaim over the years and have often been controversial. Variety Magazine describes him as “a very talented director”, while The Irish Times calls him “Irish cinema’s enfant terrible” and Hot Press writes that “Jones has repeatedly proven himself to be one of the most schemers of Ireland…”

SILICON DOCKS was a voluntary lockdown project the filmmaker created with a group of artists using extremely limited resources in part to keep them all from going crazy during the pandemic and will be available free for everyone to watch unmonetized on YouTube starting October 1.

Trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cG8gwP3kQfE

Inquiries silicondocks@grahamjones.ie

Publicity pictures https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1slPbPqndtHCmLWKZ9gGGc41KfTpuwM51

Operating time 1 hr 23 min

With GRACE POWER, SHANE LYNCH, BRENDAN MCDONALD, FIONA BAWN-THOMPSON, BOBBY CALLOWAY, ROB SMITH, JOSÉ NAGHMAR, GERRY CANNON and

Matthew McMAHON

Hosted by KASIA WIŚNIEWSKA

Production designer DIEP HOANG

Background SONIA EGAN

Music by FREEDOM TRAIL STUDIO, FUTUREMONO, THE TOWER OF LIGHT, RKVC, ASHLEY SHADOW, DAN LEBOWITZ

Written and Directed by GRAHAM JONES

Share the article on social networks or by e-mail:

]]>
Irish music and culture extravaganza Fleadh Cheoil returns after a two-year hiatus https://irishcentre.org/irish-music-and-culture-extravaganza-fleadh-cheoil-returns-after-a-two-year-hiatus/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 14:38:17 +0000 https://irishcentre.org/irish-music-and-culture-extravaganza-fleadh-cheoil-returns-after-a-two-year-hiatus/ President Michael D. Higgins will open Fleadh Cheoil na hÉireann, the Irish cultural event that will bring music, dance and celebration to every corner in Mullingar next week, from July 31 to August 7, 2022.

The Fleadh Cheoil – the world’s largest annual celebration of Irish music, language, song and dance – returns to Mullingar after a two-year absence with support from the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sports and Media. It is one of the most important cultural festivals in Europe, attracting almost 500,000 visitors to the host city each year.

Minister Catherine Martin welcomed the return of the Irish festival after a pandemic-related hiatus. Speaking of Fleadh Cheoil na hÉireann, which is run by Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann, the TD said: “It’s a hugely important cultural event for our nation, but it’s also a big boost for local tourism, and not would not be possible without the many volunteers and supporters at Comhaltas and in the wider host community.

“I am pleased to see the re-emergence at the regional and community level of such a wealth of talent after a long and difficult period of caution and restraint. We can look forward to witnessing the events and social gatherings that have defined the Fleadh annual for many of us over the years.”

Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann (CCÉ) has received €2 million in funding from the Department in 2022, which has been running the festival since it was first held in Mullingar in 1951. €100,000 will go towards the costs of organizing this year’s Fleadh, which is titled The Homecoming because of the great Comhaltas history of the county town of Westmeath. He will return to Mullingar from July 31 to August 7, 2022.

Organizers have announced that this year’s festival, which will be opened by President Michael D. Higgins on Sunday, will also focus on street entertainment with impromptu, unpaid and unamplified traditional Irish music sessions taking place in all the city.

Catherine Martin TD thanked those who contributed to Fleadh Cheoil na hÉireann: “I would like to specifically acknowledge this year the commitment and substantial support of Westmeath County Council and the Westmeath County Board of Comhaltas, which, together with its seven branches at Mullingar, Ballynacargy, Castletown-Geoghegan, Rathconrath, Moate and Castlepollard offered to bring the Fleadh to the founding town of Comhaltas.

Their efforts and dedication have paid off, and I hope they will be rewarded with public support and participation in the Fleadh program. »

The last Fleadh Cheoil took place in Drogheda, Co Louth in 2019, with previous festivals taking place in Sligo, Tullamore, Ennis, Cavan and many other towns in Ireland since 1951.

TG4 will broadcast live from Fleadh Cheoil na hÉireann from Friday August 5th to Sunday August 7th each evening from 9.30pm to 11pm. The series will also be available live worldwide on the TG4 Player.

]]>
Live Irish Music at Orange Hall in Niagara Falls https://irishcentre.org/live-irish-music-at-orange-hall-in-niagara-falls/ Tue, 12 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://irishcentre.org/live-irish-music-at-orange-hall-in-niagara-falls/
A color guard leads the July 12 parade in Toronto several years ago.  The parade will again take place in Toronto on July 16, then Loyal Orange Lodges in Niagara will hold an event at Orange Hall in Niagara Falls on July 18 with visitors from Northern Ireland and Irish bands.

When it comes to music, few places in the world can boast tunes as lively and lively as the Irish.

But Niagara residents don’t need to hop on a jet and cross the pond to the Emerald Isle to get a healthy dose of live Irish music; they can do so simply by going to the Orange Hall at the corner of Drummond Road and Dunn Street in Niagara Falls on July 18.

That’s because Loyal Orange Lodge #998 and Loyal Orange Lodge #77, two local Niagara lodges of the Orange Order of Ontario, will be hosting different lodges and visitors from Northern Ireland at an event featuring featuring three Irish bands, starting at 7 p.m.

Sean Bell, Acting Secretary of Orange Lodge #77, said the Orange Order of Ontario is a fraternal organization originally based in Northern Ireland to support and uphold the Protestant faith and the British monarchy. . The two local lodges have been part of the Niagara community since the 1800s.

On July 16, the Order will hold its July 12 parade in Toronto, marking a pivotal battle in history dating back to the late 1600s. Bell said that while this year technically marks the parade’s 202nd year, the past two years have been limited to virtual events, so this year will essentially mark the big bicentenary celebration that would have taken place in 2020.

Bell said it was the longest continuous parade in North America.

“Many bands and members travel from all over the world – mainly from Northern Ireland, where our order originated – to help us parade and celebrate,” Bell said. While in Canada, some of the visitors will travel to the event in Niagara Falls.

The local event will take place outdoors, bands performing in Niagara Falls will be announced later. Bell said entertainment is open to everyone. “It’s also for people in the neighborhood,” he says. “We invite people to come and chat with us.

“We want to extend our invitation to anyone who might be interested in coming to watch and celebrate with us.”

The address of the lodge is 6202 Dunn St.

CLARIFICATION, July 13, 2022: This article has been edited from a previously published version to more accurately reflect the date of the historic battle commemorated in the July 12 parade.

]]> 2024 S Marquis Gallegos discusses Big Summer and Notre Dame https://irishcentre.org/2024-s-marquis-gallegos-discusses-big-summer-and-notre-dame/ Thu, 07 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://irishcentre.org/2024-s-marquis-gallegos-discusses-big-summer-and-notre-dame/

2024 Chaminade High School (California) security Marquis Gallegos‍ has been busy this summer as he is unhappy with having national recruiting.

The 6-foot-1, 175-pound player wants to expand his game, which includes better coverage.

“The most important thing is to get bigger, faster and stronger,” Gallegos told ISD. “I really focused on my footwork and being more comfortable in men’s coverage as well.”

Gallegos saw his hard work pay off as he competed in the biggest national 7-on-7 tournament of the summer in Las Vegas at OT7.

“That experience was pretty cool,” Gallegos said. “It was well organized and the most important thing for me was being able to get those quality reps. It didn’t matter what team you were playing because every team was full of four and five star players with great great receivers and quarterbacks I wanted to go there to get some quality reps and it really benefited me.

The four-star prospect has been recognized with a list of standout performers by some outlets, but more importantly, Gallegos has proven himself that he can perform with anyone.

“I think I did very well,” Gallegos said. “I did well throughout the tournament. I got a chance to play men’s cover against some of the top guys. I felt good and I had confidence.”

Confidence is always key in safeties and Gallegos returned to California with a ton of confidence, which should give his junior season a good boost.

“It helps a lot,” Gallegos said. “There was competition everywhere with all the top guys. If I’m competing against the top guys and doing well, then I should dominate at home.”

On the recruiting front, the West Hills native has stayed in touch with Notre Dame and Chris O’Leary with Cal, Oklahoma, Oregon State and USC.

“It’s the same thing,” explained Gallegos, who traveled to South Bend for the spring game. “Notre Dame is trying to get me to come in for more visits and they’ve made it known that I’m a priority and they want me there.”

Building strong relationships has been at the forefront of recruiting Gallegos and O’Leary has done a great job so far.

“We’re definitely building a bond,” Gallegos said. “It’s great to communicate with him and when September rolls around then we can really start talking.”

Gallegos has seen his recruiting take off domestically and it’s something he (and every rookie) has dreamed of for years.

“It hit me,” Gallegos said. “It’s a blessing. I always have to stay humble, but it’s pretty cool to know that I’m one of the best and hard work pays off.”

As for what’s next, Gallegos will be planning a few visits over the course of the season as he wants to experience matchday environments.

“I’m looking to get in a few games during the season, but I don’t know where yet,” Gallegos said. ”

Offers: Arizona, California, Colorado, Fresno State, Michigan, Nebraska, Notre Dame, Oklahoma, Oregon, Oregon State, San Diego State, San Jose State, UCLA, USC and Washington

Ranking
ISD: 91 (four stars)
247: 88 (three stars)
Rivals: 5.6 (three stars)
ESPN: N/A
Compound: 89.76 (four stars)

Year Two Highlights

Notre Dame Fighting Irish Top of the World Fitted Hat

]]>
Former Notre Dame QB Brady Quinn discusses conference realignment https://irishcentre.org/former-notre-dame-qb-brady-quinn-discusses-conference-realignment/ Sat, 02 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://irishcentre.org/former-notre-dame-qb-brady-quinn-discusses-conference-realignment/

UCLA and USC shocked the college athletic world Thursday by joining the Big 10. That makes sense on many levels, but it also opens up the possibility of meaningful change in college sports.

It certainly looks like Notre Dame will have to weigh its options as the Irish could hold the keys to reshaping college athletics in the future.

Former Notre Dame quarterback Brady Quinn joined CBS headquarters and felt the Fighting Irish were in a good position, as it is a coveted institution both academically and athletically.

“I think you can both argue that they’d be the most wanted free agent if you want — if you want to call them that because they’re independent,” Quinn told CBS. “Or potentially, they could be watching the landscape change before their eyes and they have to decide if they want to stay independent.”

Money is at the center of the discussion, as football generates money for television and there is a nice amount of change available if Notre Dame were to join a conference. Notre Dame currently plays five ACC games in football and has conference ties to the ACC and Big 10 in hockey.

The trick is the rights grant the ACC has with ESPN, which doesn’t end until 2036, so if Clemson or Miami wanted to leave, it’s pretty expensive. Notre Dame also has his contract with NBC, which is ending much earlier, so it doesn’t appear to be a potential issue at this time.

“The ACC had to beg ESPN to take them and basically get the rights granted for this long period of time,” Quinn said. “That’s not the deal for Notre Dame because they have their deal for their home games with NBC Sports and that deal is coming sooner. There’s probably the ability for Notre Dame, if they want to, to opt out. of his deal with NBC Sports potentially early – not sure if that’s a fact, I’m speculating here, or expect it to happen in I Think 2025.

If Notre Dame were to step down, the salary would be much larger and benefit the university more than the current deal with NBC.

“If that’s the case, you’re now looking at other partners, potentially FOX, or whoever else would bid on you,” Quinn explained. “You also have the potential to say why not just join a conference instead of trying to work out that east coast to west coast schedule like we’ve been doing for a long time as an independent. We already have the inventory to make it into the Big 10 and by the way, we’re making over $70 million a year from this TV rights deal, which would eclipse what they’re currently making between their ACC cut and what they get from NBC Sports.

Both the Big 10 and the SEC would like Notre Dame, so that’s a good position to be in ultimately when it comes to options, but the other piece of the puzzle is that Notre Dame needs to figure out if it can compete with win championships if he doesn’t join a superconference.

“I’m sure they’re calling Notre Dame, but I’m sure Notre Dame is sitting there listening to wonder if this is going to turn into two superconferences and if so are we going to be at the outside to watch,” Quinn said. “Maybe it’s time to start thinking about joining a conference. Geographically speaking and given their history with planning, it probably makes more sense to join a conference like the Big 10.

“The ACC, SEC geographically makes sense for these two to work together. Here’s the reality. There’s such a disconnect between what the SEC does and what the Big 10 will do compared to the PAC12, ACC and Big 12. There it is just what it is.

Another interesting aspect is that Oregon and Washington are looking closely at the power of Notre Dame while the Big 10 and the SEC seem to be waiting to see what Jack Swarbrick and company decide.

“Money is really what all these schools and brands are really after,” Quinn said. “The question is, which ones do the SEC and the Big 10 want? If they really wanted Oregon and Washington, they would have asked them first. It wouldn’t just be USC and UCLA, but USC, UCLA, Oregon and Washington.

“It really becomes now what the rest of some of these schools in PAC12, ACC when you talk about what Florida State and Miami want to do. I don’t see there’s room for a third super conference. I think it’s going to end up being two super conferences very similar to how we see the NFL with the NFC and the AFC. Then they’ll play a playoff for a Super Bowl and, in this case, a playoff for a national championship in the future.”

Notre Dame Fighting Irish HOVR Sonic 4 Running Shoe

]]>
BREAK | 2023 OL Charles Jagusah commits to Notre-Dame https://irishcentre.org/break-2023-ol-charles-jagusah-commits-to-notre-dame/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://irishcentre.org/break-2023-ol-charles-jagusah-commits-to-notre-dame/

Even as Notre Dame began to assemble an elite-level offensive line for the Class of 2023, landing the commitments of four of its top prospects in the spring, one target was still high on the wish list.

This target just moved from wishlist to commit list with Charles Jagusah‍ today announcing its commitment to the Irish.

The 2023 Illinois elite offensive lineman picked Notre Dame over fellow finalist Michigan and a host of other offers including Illinois, Iowa, Arkansas, Missouri, LSU, Oklahoma, Miami and Tennessee, among others.

“The opportunity they provide outside of football, but also the opportunity to play at a university known for its o-line and to play under a coach like (Harry) Hiestand, who is really only a good guy,” Jagusah said. ISD of its decision earlier this week.

The Alleman Catholic High School star got her offer from the Irish last August and was described as “seriously interested” ahead of her first visit last autumn. But Jagusah acknowledged the Irish have moved up the ranks of his list with the composition of South Bend’s new staff, in particular the return of Hiestand and the appointment of Marcus Freeman as head coach.

“It’s a process, you just have to figure it out, but I think it all worked out,” he said.

Jagusah joins a group of offensive line commits that includes Sam Pendletonand Sullivan Abcher‍, both from North Carolina, Arizona elie paigeand Joe Otting‍ of Kansas. Pendleton started the job by committing in April with Absher a month later and Otting and Paige committing just days apart earlier this month.

“It’s already one of the best o-line classes in the country,” Jagusah said. “I just hope I can add to that.”

Jagusah made four official visits within a two-week period earlier this month, ending the tour with an abbreviated official at Notre Dame.

It’s clear that by then he had pretty much seen everything he needed to see, although he did make a few phone calls afterwards to ask a few final questions. And then there was the moment he let the staff know he was coming.

Jagusah described a kind of mixed reaction from the coaches.

“Everyone was excited,” he said. “Some people were a little calmer than others, some people were just running around screaming for no reason.”

Well, not exactly without reason.

Movie Don’t Lie | Charles Jagusah

“>

Notre Dame Fighting Irish Silicone Apple Watch Band ($39.95)

]]>
Tribute to Irish music legend Denis Cahill https://irishcentre.org/tribute-to-irish-music-legend-denis-cahill/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 16:34:55 +0000 https://irishcentre.org/tribute-to-irish-music-legend-denis-cahill/

Family, friends and fans of Dennis Cahill pay tribute to the wonderful Chicago musician who forever enriched the traditional Irish music scene.

When Chicago musician Jimmy Keane first informed many of us via social media that his longtime friend and fellow Chicagoan Dennis Cahill had passed away on Monday, June 20, the message was short but poignant.

Before taking her last breath, Cahill’s wife of 10 years, Mary Joyce, leaned over and kissed him moments after he shared two tracks from Martin Hayes and Cahill’s debut album, The Lonesome Touch for Green Linnet. Records in 1997. The tracks were ‘The Lament for Limerick’ and ‘My Love is in America’. Appropriately, they conveyed the meaning of the present moment and of an extraordinary life drawing to a close.

Dennis Cahill was 68 when complications from a long illness took him to Chicago last week. Born in Chicago on June 16, 1954, he grew up on the South Side but was an ardent Cubs fan.

He started playing the guitar at the age of nine and would make music his lifelong profession, playing a wide range of genres before becoming one of the most creative and famous guitarists in traditional music. Irish. Many of us in the tradosphere were unaware that his early performing career was as a singer/songwriter in the folk/rock scene around Chicago and the Midwest who had a successful partnership with another Clareman, George Casey of West Clare .

More than 35 years ago, his life was about to take another turn when he met a newly arrived immigrant from Clare, Martin Hayes, who landed in Chicago in the mid-1980s. They played in a Celtic jazz band -folk-rock called Midnight Court into the Chicagoland bar scene and festival circuit.

Then something clicked between them and Martin persuaded Dennis to get into traditional music as a duo, and there was something very rare but magical about the way the tandem explored time-worn tunes in the canon. traditional.

For 30 years, the combination of Hayes on fiddle and Cahill on guitar revolutionized the performance of traditional music as they performed on the finest stages of performing arts centers around the world, saved from being trapped in the bars of Chicago.

Their approach seemed very simple taking old Irish melodies, starting very slowly then speeding up a bit to explore all the nuances that could be gleaned from them while creating an explosive reaction between Hayes’ fiery fiddle playing and spare playing. and precise of Cahill. accompaniment merging unusual chords and rhythm all around the melody.

Siobhan Long in her obituary for Cahill in The Irish Times (June 26) put it succinctly: “Cahill’s minimalism may have sometimes been seen as simple, but it was never that. Beneath the bare bones of his guitar lines lie the most intricate and carefully crafted arrangements. Cahill was never just an accompanist.

Irish President Michael D. Higgins, who is said to have seen the couple perform together very often, including during a meeting at the White House with President Barack Obama, further suggested reflecting on Cahill’s prowess: “Dennis brought a unique and innovative style to his guitar playing while being deeply respectful of the essence of traditional Irish music.

So many of Hayes and Cahill’s friends and fans have gathered online over the past week to remember the quiet, gentle man who struck a good balance between traveling the world with Hayes and returning home. in Chicago. There were many stories of him hosting music sessions around town, offering help and support to young musicians and also lending his very attentive ear and production skills to people who came to his house. and his North Side recording studio.

Like so many other commentators, I have always enjoyed meeting Dennis over the years at countless performances and enjoying his great sense of humor and discussions of politics or sports. A few times we stayed as logistical castmates when the Tulla Ceili Band went on tour in 1997 for their 50th anniversary, and a few years later for Lincoln Center’s Midsummer Night’s Swing dance series. It was great spending time with him during the quiet hours on the road.

It was also an opportunity to see how Cahill had bonded with the Hayes family (Father P. Joe Hayes, the band’s frontman and Peggy, Martin’s mother, who kept a room for the frequent stays of Dennis in Ireland), and also with the members of the Tulla Band as well. The very definition of hail is well fulfilled.

It was an enduring musical partnership and friendship between Cahill and Hayes that reflected the gentle and genuine natures of both men. Hayes’ exploration for further musical collaboration saw them continue to work together in the successful and innovative ensemble The Gloaming, and later the Martin Hayes Quartet with Liz Knowles and Doug Wieselman. Much of this full heritage can still be discovered on records at www.martinhayes.com.

Hayes wrote a very heartfelt and thoughtful reminiscence to his longtime partner on a trip last week that he shared on Facebook, and I’ll leave the final words here as a testament to that relationship and its impact on the world. traditional music.

“We started a musical journey many years ago in the barrooms of Chicago, we didn’t think we would ever make it out of those bars to the concert stage, but today the president of Ireland and the Government Minister for the Arts were both writing about the huge impact you have had on the world of traditional music.You have come out of the bar scene and onto some of the finest stages in the world .

“You really succeeded, you brought everything together in a more beautiful crystallization of your loves and musical influences. Nobody before you had ever played those chords and rhythms with Irish music like you did. You’ve paired the beauty of these traditional Irish melodies with your own equally beautiful hypnotic chord sequences and rhythms.

“Every night we played we gave it our all, we zigzagged around until we locked ourselves in. Some of those moments were sublime moments where our connection was truly telepathic.

“There were so many times on stage where you could just read my mind and I hope you still can…we come from different musical worlds but together we created our own musical world and I think that we made a difference. I am forever indebted and grateful to you for all those magical years of music, friendship and fun.

Condolences to Mary, Cahill’s wife, his daughter-in-law Clíodhna and his sister Mairéad, as well as to Martin Hayes and his many close friends around the world.

]]>